Install Theme

Planet, 2008

&

Sphinx (fortuna), 2006

Marc Quinn

Lassù (“Up There”), performance, 1975.
Alessadro Mendini burns one of his own 1974 Lassú chairs outside of the office of Casabella magazine.

Lassù (“Up There”), performance, 1975.

Alessadro Mendini burns one of his own 1974 Lassú chairs outside of the office of Casabella magazine.

La Conica Coffee Pots by Aldo Rossi, 1984


Aircraft Carrier Coffee Set by Hans Hollein for Alessi, 1983

30% off until Monday

Creatures is on SALE! Come by or check it out online.

Happy holidays!

Photographs by Constantin Brancusi

Socrates & Adam and Eve, 1922

Timidity, 1928

Marc Bolan’s MARC

Episode One: 24 August 1977

Sing Me A Song - T.Rex

All Around The World I’ve Been Looking - The Jam

I Love To Boogie - T.Rex

Cool Wind From The North - Stephanie

No Russians In Russia - Radio Stars

Heart Throb’s Dance (You Made Me Believe In Magic / DCR)

Celebrate Summer - T.Rex

You Have What It Takes - Showaddywaddy

Jeepster - T.Rex

Photo of destroyed Gerhard Richter painting
In the 1960s, Gerhard Richter destroyed over 60 paintings by painting over them during a self-critical period. Before the destruction, he photographed each one.

Photo of destroyed Gerhard Richter painting

In the 1960s, Gerhard Richter destroyed over 60 paintings by painting over them during a self-critical period. Before the destruction, he photographed each one.

Two Recipes from John Cage

SWEET NUT BALL RECIPE

Four cups of ground walnuts;

4 cups of flour;

12 tablespoons of sugar;

2 2/3 cups of butter;

4 teaspoons of vanilla.

Form into circa 125 small balls.

Bake at 350 degrees in motel oven.

Now back to Room 135.

Roll in 1 pound of powdered sugar.

Nut balls.

From Empty words: writings ‘73-‘78


ALMOND COOKIE RECIPE:

 Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a food processor, grind:

1 c. raw almonds

1 c. raw oats

Combine almonds and oats in a large bowl.  Stir in:

1 c. whole wheat flour or brown rice flour (if you want a gluten free option, you may need to add slightly more than the 1 c. brown rice flour, so that you are later able to form balls with the dough)

Add ground cinnamon to the dry mixture.

To the dry mixture, add:

1/2 c. almond oil (other nut oils work as well)

1/2 c. real maple syrup (no Aunt Jemima!)

Stir mixture until you are able to form one-inch balls.  Place on ungreased cookie sheet.  Flatten slightly, and press a small dollop of your favorite jam or preserves (jelly is too thin) into the center of each cookie.  Bake for 15-20 minutes, turning the pan once, halfway through the baking process.  Cookies are done when light golden brown.  They store well in the fridge.

From the Walker Art Center

Jeff Burton is a Los Angeles based photographer.

How Artists Must Dress

by Roger White

via N+1 

From the Paper Monument pamphlet, I Like Your Work.

Artists must first of all distinguish themselves from members of the adjacent professional classes typically present at art world events: dealers, critics, curators, and caterers. They must second of all take care not to look like artists. This double negation founds the generative logic of artists’ fashion.

The relationship between an artist’s work and attire should not take the form of a direct visual analogy. A stripe painter may not wear stripes.

The relationship between an artist’s work and attire should function in the manner of a dialectic, in which the discrepancy between the personal appearance of the artist and the appearance of her work is resolved into a higher conceptual unity. An artist’s attire should open her work to a wider range of interpretive possibilities.

The artist’s sartorial choices are subject to the same hermeneutic operations as are his work. When dressing, an artist should imagine a five-paragraph review of his clothes—the attitudes and intentions they reveal, their topicality, their relationship to history, the extent to which they challenge or endorse, subvert or affirm dominant forms of fashion—written by a critic he detests.

Communicating an attitude of complete indifference to one’s personal appearance is only achievable through a process of self-reflexive critique bordering on the obsessive. Artists who are in reality oblivious to how they dress never achieve this effect.

Whereas a dealer must signal, in wardrobe, a sympathy to the tastes and tendencies of the collector class, an artist is under no obligation to endorse these. Rather, the task of the artist with regard to fashion is to interrogate the relationship between cost and value as it pertains to clothing, and, by analogy, to artworks.

An artist compensates for a limited wardrobe budget by making creative and entertaining clothing choices, much in the way that a dog compensates for a lack of speech through vigorous barking.

Artists are not only permitted but are in fact required to be underdressed at formal institutional functions. But egregious slovenliness without regard to context is a childish ploy, easily seen through.

An artist may dress like a member of the proletariat, but shouldn’t imagine he’s fooling anyone.

The affluent artist may make a gesture of class solidarity by dressing poorly. She is advised to keep in mind that, at an art opening, the best way to spot an heiress is to look for a destitute schizophrenic. Middle-class or working-class artists, the destitute, and the schizophrenic can use this principle to their social advantage.

The extension of fashion into the violation of norms of personal hygiene and basic grooming constitutes the final arena for radicalism in artists’ fashion. Brave, fragrant souls! You will be admired from a distance.

A conversation with architect and designer Ettore Sottsass about his exhibition of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston. He also discusses the influence of postmodernism on his work and his designs in Italy.

Nam June Paik, Reclining Buddha, 1994

Nam June Paik, Reclining Buddha, 1994

Victoria Bergsman, aka Taken By Trees wearing our Carissa dress this past Tuesday at the Henry Fonda Theater w/ Jens Lekman and Big Search.

John Stezaker, Shadow 10 (2006) & Untitled (Film Portrait), (2006)

Mile-A-Minute Girls

Lillian La France (1894–1979) was a stunt motorcycle rider during the 1920s and 1930s. She wore a skull and crossbones emblem and rode the Motodrome, aka the “Wall of Death”.

Hazel Marion Eaton (1895-1970) was a “Wall of Death” rider in the 1910s and 20s.

Eaton rode along the inside of the barrel wall at speeds up to 60 miles per hour – often with no hands. She told a reporter that although the riding appeared to be “clever,” she more or less functioned without really thinking about the danger or what she was doing.