Install Theme
Illustration by Emory Douglas for the Black Panther Party
1968

Illustration by Emory Douglas for the Black Panther Party

1968

Untitled (Self-Portrait)
1945

Untitled, New York, 1944
1944

Erwin Blumenfeld

Surya Bonaly is a three-time World silver medalist, a five-time European champion, the 1991 World Junior Champion and a nine-time French national champion. She is a former gymnast and the first woman to ever attempt the quadruple toe loop. She is perhaps best known for completing a one bladed backflip during her free skate at the 1998 Winter Olympics. She is the only skater to ever do this (male or female). 

The only thing more bad ass than that is why she did it. As we all know Olympic figure skating can be quite racist and Surya was tired of being given consistently lower scores than her white counterparts, and she wasn’t shy about it. She believed that this was exactly why she has been given a low score on her short program earlier in the day, and decided to send the judges a message.

Now back flips are crazy dangerous. If you don’t land perfectly you can severely injure yourself, which would sideline any athlete, potentially permanently. In order to discourage athletes from attempting them, they were made illegal in Olympic competition. The official reason they gave is because all jumps must be landed on one blade to be scored and, of course, in order to complete a back flip you must land on both feet.

So not only did she complete an insanely risky and difficult move but when Surya landed her back flip she essentially made it legal, because she was able to do it while still only using one blade. She was daring the judges to try and low ball her. Unfortunately, they still ruled the move was illegal and deducted it against her in her final score. She may have been unable to medal but she got the last laugh. After completing her free skate she turned her back to the judges, showing them just how much their opinions matter. For this, and for everything else, she goes down in history as not only one the greatest figure skaters ever but a true bad ass.

Excerpted from here.

Max Ernst at Peggy Guggenheim’s home, New York, fall 1942
photograph by Hermann Landshoff

Max Ernst at Peggy Guggenheim’s home, New York, fall 1942

photograph by Hermann Landshoff

Uncut
1997

Bodyguard
2008

Ron Arad

A MAGAZINE no. 1 

curated by Maison Martin Margiela

Blind Country

Mike Kelley & Ericka Beckman

It was inspired by the H.G. Wells short story The Country of the Blind, which was a favorite of mine as an adolescent. I was both fascinated and repulsed by this tale of a man having to give up his eyes to live in an alien sightless society. In rereading it as an adult I was struck by the obvious fact, which I was oblivious to as a boy, that it is a castration story, and by the thinly veiled sexual and racial fears within it. Blind Country bears no discernable reference to the Wells story but instead plays with these subtle underlying themes. 

- Mike Kelley

Two Pink Tons (D), 2008
Roni Horn

Two Pink Tons (D), 2008

Roni Horn

pink flowers in the vase, 2013
Howard Fonda

pink flowers in the vase, 2013

Howard Fonda

Fendi Progeny, 2005

Jimmy Choo Progeny, 2005

Chanel Progeny, 2005

Ida Applebroog

Pina Bausch in Männer Vogue, c. 1984-1989

Pina Bausch in Männer Vogue, c. 1984-1989

Surface magazine, 1999.

Surface magazine, 1999.

Scrapbooks of Walter Pfeiffer, 1969-1985.

Tonsure (rear view), 1921Marcel Duchamp (photographed by Man Ray, 1890–1976)
This portrait of Duchamp, probably taken by the artist’s friend Man Ray, shows the back of Duchamp’s head with his star/comet tonsure haircut. The motivations for and circumstances surrounding the haircut remain unclear, but the tonsure and star/comet imagery have multiple meanings. The tonsure historically served as a symbol of the célibat,or one who withdraws from society. By 1921 Duchamp had repeatedly withdrawn from artistic, social, familial, and romantic engagements.
It is possible that the tonsure haircut also refers to Rrose Sélavy, Duchamp’s female alter ego, who first emerged in 1920. The five-pointed star, which from Roman times has been called the “Rose of Venus,” is associated with the goddess of love and functions as symbol of the feminine. In this way, the tonsure can be considered an outward sign of Duchamp’s multiple and shifting identities.

Tonsure (rear view), 1921
Marcel Duchamp (photographed by Man Ray, 1890–1976)

This portrait of Duchamp, probably taken by the artist’s friend Man Ray, shows the back of Duchamp’s head with his star/comet tonsure haircut. The motivations for and circumstances surrounding the haircut remain unclear, but the tonsure and star/comet imagery have multiple meanings. The tonsure historically served as a symbol of the célibat,or one who withdraws from society. By 1921 Duchamp had repeatedly withdrawn from artistic, social, familial, and romantic engagements.

It is possible that the tonsure haircut also refers to Rrose Sélavy, Duchamp’s female alter ego, who first emerged in 1920. The five-pointed star, which from Roman times has been called the “Rose of Venus,” is associated with the goddess of love and functions as symbol of the feminine. In this way, the tonsure can be considered an outward sign of Duchamp’s multiple and shifting identities.

Punk Art Exhibition - The Catalogue
Washington Project For The Arts
Washington, DC, 1978

Punk Art Exhibition - The Catalogue

Washington Project For The Arts

Washington, DC, 1978